Woodridge Animal Hospital
(630) 985-3101
2009 W. 75th Street, Woodridge, IL  60517
                       dr.amy@woodridgeanimalhospital.com
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Mosquito Repellent Options
The external parasite preventative I recommend is Frontline Plus because of its high level of safety, excellent efficacy when applied appropriately, and the guarantee the manufacturer provides when purchased through a veterinarian.  Unfortunately, it doesn't provide any protection against mosquitos.
The two diseases that are most commonly a concern with mosquito exposure are heartworm and West Nile Virus.
Mosquito repellents haven't been a concern until recently because we have very effective heartworm preventatives when used as directed and using a mosquito repellent as a prevention for heartworm disease has been proven to not be effective.  However, recently there have been increased incidents of West Nile Virus illness in people who live in our area.  With this fact and since heartworm disease is also very prevalent, I'm of the opinion that additional safe prevention is never a bad idea.  This applies particularly to our highly exposed, older, and the immune compromised patients.

Several options for prevention are available.  I have only used #1 as a repellent personally, but the other options listed have been used and recommended by other veterinarians.  With all of these products, do not apply directly to or on your pet's eyes, mouth, nose, and genitalia.
1.  Pyrethrin based dog flea and tick spray- available at pet retail stores.  
These sprays contain one of the following active ingredients- pyrethrin,
permethrin, or pyrethroid.  Since your pet is already protected from
fleas and ticks using Frontline Plus, you don't need to apply these products as 
directed.  Instead, you can just lightly dust your dog with the product, in the same 
way you would use a mosquito repellent on yourself.  Never use a product 
containing one of the above mentioned active ingredients on a cat and caution 
should be used if one is applied to a dog that lives with a cat.  Cats can have severe 
reactions to these ingredients, even if the product isn't applied directly on them.  
The nice thing about these products is that any residue can be rinsed away with 
water.
2.  Mosquito repellents used on people can also be used with the same light dusting 
application.  However, because pets will lick and groom themselves, you should not 
use any product using DEET.
3.  Skin-so-soft by Avon is used for repelling mosquitos on people and I've heard from 
clients as well as veterinarians that this product works very well in repelling mosquitos 
on pets.  One veterinarian recommended diluting the product in a 1:1 dilution with 
water and use a squirt bottle to apply the light dusting.  Be careful exposing light 
haired or short haired pets to excessive sun when using this repellent.  Skin-so-soft 
contains oils that can cause sunburn to occur or to be more severe.